6 Questions to Consider When Rebranding Your Company

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Things to consider before rebranding your company.

Here at Cleveland creative agency Go Media, we take branding very seriously. We have helped many companies, who’ve undergone natural growth and change, take necessary steps to transform the face of their company for the better. Consider these six simple questions when rebranding your own company and you’ll be on the road to success.

1. What is the goal?

Don’t rebrand simply just because. You should have a specific set of goals driving your rebrand. Perhaps, for example, you are a tech company who needs to modernize a logo designed in the 70′s. Ask yourself why you are rebranding and give yourself an excellent answer. Don’t have one? It may not be time.

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2. Is brand boredom the reason for the rebrand?

Many times business owners will rebrand because they’re suffering from brand boredom. They’re looking at their brand all day long, every day. Brand boredom, on the part of the business owner, is normal and only natural. This, however, not a good reason to rebrand! Remember that clients are not coming into contact with your brand as frequently as you. They need to become familiar with your color schemes, fonts, mark. This can only be accomplished through consistency.

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3. What is your brand equity?

Is your brand equity good or bad? When customers come in contact with your logo, do they remember the amazing work you’ve done for them? Or, do they instead only recall a negative experience with you? If you believe your brand to have a positive brand equity, this is extremely valuable! Hold onto that value! If you feel a change is in order, a brand refresh, is what we recommend. With a brand refresh, you’ll use enough new elements to move the brand forward while keeping enough old elements to maintain brand recognition.

Consider your brand to have a negative equity? You may want to try something new, so far as considering a new name and a new brand. You’ll want to completely break any negative association with your brand if needed. For example, imagine you owned an airline that had a 50% incidence rate of plane crashes over a one year period. Your brand equity would call for a complete change to say the least.

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4. What costs are involved?

When thinking about doing a rebrand of your company, you must consider all of the costs involved. Your brand is more pervasive than you may at first think and if you’re considering a rebrand you’ll have to replace everything relatively quickly. This includes your letterhead, your website, building signs, ads, etc.  Hesitate to do so and your customers will be seeing two brands for an extended period of time. Focus on primary touch points first, then go from there. Also, possibly hold off on a rebrand until you have exhausted your stock of items with old branding. This way, when you’ve rebranding, you can restock and be all ready to go!

5. Have you considered your whole brand?

Keep in mind that your brand is not only a logo, but that your brand also embodies your company in its entirety. Your brand is your personality, its messaging, copy. Your brand is what you say and how you say it. Your brand is your company’s vibe, the music you play, your uniform, the furniture in your office. Consider a rebrand and how these elements may be impacted.

6. How will you transition the rebrand?

The rebranding process can be very disruptive if not handled with finesse. Making major aesthetic shifts or changing your names can confuse customers. Consider how you’ll educate your customers about the transition to your new brand. Some examples? Place your old brand next to your new brand, or explain very clearly to customers that “ABC Company is now XYZ Company.”  Take some time to let things sink in.

Considering a rebrand? Don’t forget to consult your friends here at Go Media!

About the Author, William Beachy

I grew up in Cleveland Hts. Ohio and was drawing constantly. As a child I took art classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art and eventually became known as the "class artist." I graduated from The Ohio State University's department of Industrial Design. I have always tried to blend my passion for illustration with Graphic Design. Go Media was the culmination of my interests for both business and art. I'm trying to build a company that is equally considerate of our designers AND our clients.

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